Why El Niño Is Never A Good Bet

The photo above is of Russian River flooding from storms during the 1997-98 El Niño. But it turns out the relationship between El Niño and California precipitation is actually pretty murky.

From KQED Science, it’s California drought myth-busting:

If, like many Californians, you’ve been on El Niño Watch, you’re no-doubt confused by now. It’s happening. It’s not happening. But whether it is or isn’t might matter less than you think.

“Don’t count on El Niño for anything,” Jay Lund, a UC Davis hydrologist , admonished us at a July drought briefing in Washington, D.C.

Photo by Dave Gatley/FEMA.

According to a new report by the San Jose Mercury News, local water agencies are losing about 23 billion gallons of treated water each year. Most of that loss is attributed to aging pipelines that leak before reaching customer meters.

Full story: Leaky Pipes Lose Billions of Gallons of Water Every Year in the Bay Area

There’s less room for boats at Bidwell Marina on Lake Oroville.
Find more then and now photos: California’s Shrinking Reservoirs There’s less room for boats at Bidwell Marina on Lake Oroville.
Find more then and now photos: California’s Shrinking Reservoirs

There’s less room for boats at Bidwell Marina on Lake Oroville.


Find more then and now photos: California’s Shrinking Reservoirs

More then and now photos of California’s shrinking reservoirs. More then and now photos of California’s shrinking reservoirs.

In Tulare County, Wells Run Dry as Farmers Dig Deep

Despite California’s extreme drought, farmers continue to plant more water-intensive, high-value crops. Almonds, most of which are exported, use a full 10% of the state’s water. Almost no surface water is available, so farmers are drilling ever deeper into the aquifers below their land.

Meanwhile, some surrounding communities that rely on that same resource are running out of water to drink.

Read more: In Tulare County, Wells Run Dry as Farmers Dig Deep

The California Report’s Scott Shafer shared this photo on his Twitter account while he was out on assignment. “Thousands of dead orange trees in Lindsay, Calif. No rain, no water, no fruit,” he wrote.

A night view of the Happy Camp Complex fire, burning in Klamath National Forest east of Crescent City. (U.S. Forest Service)

Get this … in some parts of California, the drought is causing mountains to grow taller.

Full story: Epic Drought in West Is Literally Moving Mountains

The town of Montague in Northern California is running low on water.
In the middle photo, you can see one way they’re trying to save what they have left: Water manager Chris Tyhurst is using a modified flour sifter to sprinkle a powder across Montague’s small reservoir. The product, made from palm oil and hydrated lime, is supposed to slow evaporation.
They’re also building an emergency pipeline, to bring water from a nearby river to the reservoir.
Read more about Montague —>

All photos by Daniel Potter for KQED. The town of Montague in Northern California is running low on water.
In the middle photo, you can see one way they’re trying to save what they have left: Water manager Chris Tyhurst is using a modified flour sifter to sprinkle a powder across Montague’s small reservoir. The product, made from palm oil and hydrated lime, is supposed to slow evaporation.
They’re also building an emergency pipeline, to bring water from a nearby river to the reservoir.
Read more about Montague —>

All photos by Daniel Potter for KQED. The town of Montague in Northern California is running low on water.
In the middle photo, you can see one way they’re trying to save what they have left: Water manager Chris Tyhurst is using a modified flour sifter to sprinkle a powder across Montague’s small reservoir. The product, made from palm oil and hydrated lime, is supposed to slow evaporation.
They’re also building an emergency pipeline, to bring water from a nearby river to the reservoir.
Read more about Montague —>

All photos by Daniel Potter for KQED.

The town of Montague in Northern California is running low on water.

In the middle photo, you can see one way they’re trying to save what they have left: Water manager Chris Tyhurst is using a modified flour sifter to sprinkle a powder across Montague’s small reservoir. The product, made from palm oil and hydrated lime, is supposed to slow evaporation.

They’re also building an emergency pipeline, to bring water from a nearby river to the reservoir.

Read more about Montague —>

All photos by Daniel Potter for KQED.

voicesofthedrought:

"Look at the layers where the water level was used to be at? So concerning L.” #californiadrought #shastalake #savewater

From the Instagram account of lmaria at Lake Shasta.