Get this … in some parts of California, the drought is causing mountains to grow taller.

Full story: Epic Drought in West Is Literally Moving Mountains

The town of Montague in Northern California is running low on water.
In the middle photo, you can see one way they’re trying to save what they have left: Water manager Chris Tyhurst is using a modified flour sifter to sprinkle a powder across Montague’s small reservoir. The product, made from palm oil and hydrated lime, is supposed to slow evaporation.
They’re also building an emergency pipeline, to bring water from a nearby river to the reservoir.
Read more about Montague —>

All photos by Daniel Potter for KQED. The town of Montague in Northern California is running low on water.
In the middle photo, you can see one way they’re trying to save what they have left: Water manager Chris Tyhurst is using a modified flour sifter to sprinkle a powder across Montague’s small reservoir. The product, made from palm oil and hydrated lime, is supposed to slow evaporation.
They’re also building an emergency pipeline, to bring water from a nearby river to the reservoir.
Read more about Montague —>

All photos by Daniel Potter for KQED. The town of Montague in Northern California is running low on water.
In the middle photo, you can see one way they’re trying to save what they have left: Water manager Chris Tyhurst is using a modified flour sifter to sprinkle a powder across Montague’s small reservoir. The product, made from palm oil and hydrated lime, is supposed to slow evaporation.
They’re also building an emergency pipeline, to bring water from a nearby river to the reservoir.
Read more about Montague —>

All photos by Daniel Potter for KQED.

The town of Montague in Northern California is running low on water.

In the middle photo, you can see one way they’re trying to save what they have left: Water manager Chris Tyhurst is using a modified flour sifter to sprinkle a powder across Montague’s small reservoir. The product, made from palm oil and hydrated lime, is supposed to slow evaporation.

They’re also building an emergency pipeline, to bring water from a nearby river to the reservoir.

Read more about Montague —>

All photos by Daniel Potter for KQED.

voicesofthedrought:

"Look at the layers where the water level was used to be at? So concerning L.” #californiadrought #shastalake #savewater

From the Instagram account of lmaria at Lake Shasta. 

Here is a stunning image, courtesy of NASA, of the Beaver Complex Fire, made up of two Oregon fires that have spread and now straddle the Oregon-California border. 

More photos and the full story

voicesofthedrought:

“#atascadero #lake has about a month before it’s completely dried up.” #stinky #exploreslocounty #californiadrought
Photos submitted via Instagram by Slocountyinfo.
 
voicesofthedrought:

“#atascadero #lake has about a month before it’s completely dried up.” #stinky #exploreslocounty #californiadrought
Photos submitted via Instagram by Slocountyinfo.
 

voicesofthedrought:

#atascadero #lake has about a month before it’s completely dried up.” #stinky #exploreslocounty #californiadrought

Photos submitted via Instagram by Slocountyinfo.

 

El Niño Fizzle: No Relief Likely for California Drought

All that talk you’ve been hearing about El Niño coming to wash California out of its three-year drought: fahgettaboudit. Federal scientists now say the odds of those peculiar ocean conditions often associated with wet winters here have diminished substantially, and there’s now about a 65 percent chance of El Niño by late fall-early winter, right when we’d be hoping for rain and snow to return. The images above show warming (red) waters in the Pacific that indicate El Niño. Use the slider in the center to move back and forth between images and note how much the warming has dissipated in recent months. (NASA/JPL)

Learn more at KQED Science.

The last three days of fires in Northern California as recorded by NASA’s Earth Observing System Terra and Aqua satellites and downloaded from the Worldview real-time data site. There’s a pronounced dot near the center of all three images: 14,000-foot-tall Mount Shasta. The fires to the left (west) of center have been named the July Complex Fires in Klamath National Forest. The biggest fires to the right (east) of the image are the Eiler and Bald fires (a third blaze, the Day Fire, is largely obscured by clouds and smoke). The large mass of smoke and to the north of Mount Shasta is mostly from the Oregon Gulch fire, burning along the California-Oregon border southeast of the town of Ashland. 
Here are the links for the images above: 
Friday, Aug. 1
Saturday, Aug. 2
Sunday, Aug. 3 The last three days of fires in Northern California as recorded by NASA’s Earth Observing System Terra and Aqua satellites and downloaded from the Worldview real-time data site. There’s a pronounced dot near the center of all three images: 14,000-foot-tall Mount Shasta. The fires to the left (west) of center have been named the July Complex Fires in Klamath National Forest. The biggest fires to the right (east) of the image are the Eiler and Bald fires (a third blaze, the Day Fire, is largely obscured by clouds and smoke). The large mass of smoke and to the north of Mount Shasta is mostly from the Oregon Gulch fire, burning along the California-Oregon border southeast of the town of Ashland. 
Here are the links for the images above: 
Friday, Aug. 1
Saturday, Aug. 2
Sunday, Aug. 3 The last three days of fires in Northern California as recorded by NASA’s Earth Observing System Terra and Aqua satellites and downloaded from the Worldview real-time data site. There’s a pronounced dot near the center of all three images: 14,000-foot-tall Mount Shasta. The fires to the left (west) of center have been named the July Complex Fires in Klamath National Forest. The biggest fires to the right (east) of the image are the Eiler and Bald fires (a third blaze, the Day Fire, is largely obscured by clouds and smoke). The large mass of smoke and to the north of Mount Shasta is mostly from the Oregon Gulch fire, burning along the California-Oregon border southeast of the town of Ashland. 
Here are the links for the images above: 
Friday, Aug. 1
Saturday, Aug. 2
Sunday, Aug. 3

The last three days of fires in Northern California as recorded by NASA’s Earth Observing System Terra and Aqua satellites and downloaded from the Worldview real-time data site. There’s a pronounced dot near the center of all three images: 14,000-foot-tall Mount Shasta. The fires to the left (west) of center have been named the July Complex Fires in Klamath National Forest. The biggest fires to the right (east) of the image are the Eiler and Bald fires (a third blaze, the Day Fire, is largely obscured by clouds and smoke). The large mass of smoke and to the north of Mount Shasta is mostly from the Oregon Gulch fire, burning along the California-Oregon border southeast of the town of Ashland. 

Here are the links for the images above: 

Friday, Aug. 1

Saturday, Aug. 2

Sunday, Aug. 3

From NASA’s Earth Observatory, the image of the day for Sunday, Aug. 3 is an infrared view of what’s happened to two relatively obscure California reservoirs (Hensley Lake and H.V. Eastman Lake) between April 2011 (top) and now. 
Check out the Earth Observatory home page for more information on the images (and a gallery of other pictures, drought-related and otherwise). From NASA’s Earth Observatory, the image of the day for Sunday, Aug. 3 is an infrared view of what’s happened to two relatively obscure California reservoirs (Hensley Lake and H.V. Eastman Lake) between April 2011 (top) and now. 
Check out the Earth Observatory home page for more information on the images (and a gallery of other pictures, drought-related and otherwise).

From NASA’s Earth Observatory, the image of the day for Sunday, Aug. 3 is an infrared view of what’s happened to two relatively obscure California reservoirs (Hensley Lake and H.V. Eastman Lake) between April 2011 (top) and now. 

Check out the Earth Observatory home page for more information on the images (and a gallery of other pictures, drought-related and otherwise).

We shared the July 29th Drought Monitor map with you yesterday, but here’s an interesting graphic from Climate Central that shows the progression of the drought since April 1. 

Last week, 34.6% of the state was in “exceptional” drought, the most-severe classification given by the U.S. Drought Monitor. This week, that number has ballooned to 58.5%. 

Are you seeing signs of drought around you? Submit photos, stories, tips or artwork on our Tumblr page.