Do you think California’s drought is a “problem?” A “big problem?” Think the state should spend $7.5 billion on water projects that voters will either approve or kill in November?

Measure your opinions against the latest polling:
Drought Rallies Support for California Water Projects

The Sept. 22 footprint of the King Fire overlaid on a map of the Bay Area. (Dan Brekke/KQED)
Read more:  How Do You Say How Big a Really Big Fire Is?

The Sept. 22 footprint of the King Fire overlaid on a map of the Bay Area. (Dan Brekke/KQED)

Read more:  How Do You Say How Big a Really Big Fire Is?

Why More Trees in the Sierra Mean Less Water for California

With California’s reservoir levels dropping, just about everyone is wishing the state had gotten more water this year. That doesn’t just depend on the weather, according to a team of scientists. Sierra Nevada forests play a big role in the state’s water supply.

Just like crops, trees consume water. And Sierra Nevada forests are denser than they once were after decades of fire suppression. That could be reducing the amount of runoff coming from the snowpack — runoff that provides water for most of the state.

Read more from KQED Science —>

Normally, Dry Creek, just west of Napa, lives up to its name this time of year. But three days after the South Napa Earthquake, it suddenly sprang to life.

Turns out the earthquake had one interesting side-effect — it released tons of groundwater.

Full story: Quake-Revived Streams Could Keep Flowing for a While

“Ranchers are moving herds from California to Colorado and from Texas to Nebraska seeking refuge from dry weather.”

Nearly 100 people had to be evacuated by helicopter Sunday after a small backcountry fire burning in Yosemite National Park suddenly grew from 700 acres to more than 2,500 acres. Roads in the park are open, but several trails are closed.


Read more: Yosemite Fire Flares Up, Forces Helicopter Evacuations

(Yosemite National Park photo via Twitter) 

“Go where you will within a radius of from fifty to a hundred miles, there stands the colossal cone of Shasta, clad in perpetual snow, the one grand landmark that never sets.”

John Muir

Mount Shasta last week, nearly snowless.