Why More Trees in the Sierra Mean Less Water for California
With California’s reservoir levels dropping, just about everyone is wishing the state had gotten more water this year. That doesn’t just depend on the weather, according to a team of scientists. Sierra Nevada forests play a big role in the state’s water supply.
Just like crops, trees consume water. And Sierra Nevada forests are denser than they once were after decades of fire suppression. That could be reducing the amount of runoff coming from the snowpack — runoff that provides water for most of the state.
Read more from KQED Science —>

Why More Trees in the Sierra Mean Less Water for California

With California’s reservoir levels dropping, just about everyone is wishing the state had gotten more water this year. That doesn’t just depend on the weather, according to a team of scientists. Sierra Nevada forests play a big role in the state’s water supply.

Just like crops, trees consume water. And Sierra Nevada forests are denser than they once were after decades of fire suppression. That could be reducing the amount of runoff coming from the snowpack — runoff that provides water for most of the state.

Read more from KQED Science —>

Normally, Dry Creek, just west of Napa, lives up to its name this time of year. But three days after the South Napa Earthquake, it suddenly sprang to life.
Turns out the earthquake had one interesting side-effect — it released tons of groundwater.
Full story: Quake-Revived Streams Could Keep Flowing for a While

Normally, Dry Creek, just west of Napa, lives up to its name this time of year. But three days after the South Napa Earthquake, it suddenly sprang to life.

Turns out the earthquake had one interesting side-effect — it released tons of groundwater.

Full story: Quake-Revived Streams Could Keep Flowing for a While

“Ranchers are moving herds from California to Colorado and from Texas to Nebraska seeking refuge from dry weather.”

Nearly 100 people had to be evacuated by helicopter Sunday after a small backcountry fire burning in Yosemite National Park suddenly grew from 700 acres to more than 2,500 acres. Roads in the park are open, but several trails are closed.


Read more: Yosemite Fire Flares Up, Forces Helicopter Evacuations

(Yosemite National Park photo via Twitter) 

“Go where you will within a radius of from fifty to a hundred miles, there stands the colossal cone of Shasta, clad in perpetual snow, the one grand landmark that never sets.”

John Muir

Mount Shasta last week, nearly snowless.

Why El Niño Is Never A Good Bet
The photo above is of Russian River flooding from storms during the 1997-98 El Niño. But it turns out the relationship between El Niño and California precipitation is actually pretty murky.
From KQED Science, it’s California drought myth-busting:

If, like many Californians, you’ve been on El Niño Watch, you’re no-doubt confused by now. It’s happening. It’s not happening. But whether it is or isn’t might matter less than you think.
“Don’t count on El Niño for anything,” Jay Lund, a UC Davis hydrologist , admonished us at a July drought briefing in Washington, D.C.

Photo by Dave Gatley/FEMA.

Why El Niño Is Never A Good Bet

The photo above is of Russian River flooding from storms during the 1997-98 El Niño. But it turns out the relationship between El Niño and California precipitation is actually pretty murky.

From KQED Science, it’s California drought myth-busting:

If, like many Californians, you’ve been on El Niño Watch, you’re no-doubt confused by now. It’s happening. It’s not happening. But whether it is or isn’t might matter less than you think.

“Don’t count on El Niño for anything,” Jay Lund, a UC Davis hydrologist , admonished us at a July drought briefing in Washington, D.C.

Photo by Dave Gatley/FEMA.

According to a new report by the San Jose Mercury News, local water agencies are losing about 23 billion gallons of treated water each year. Most of that loss is attributed to aging pipelines that leak before reaching customer meters.Full story: Leaky Pipes Lose Billions of Gallons of Water Every Year in the Bay Area

According to a new report by the San Jose Mercury News, local water agencies are losing about 23 billion gallons of treated water each year. Most of that loss is attributed to aging pipelines that leak before reaching customer meters.

Full story: Leaky Pipes Lose Billions of Gallons of Water Every Year in the Bay Area

There’s less room for boats at Bidwell Marina on Lake Oroville.
Find more then and now photos: California’s Shrinking Reservoirs There’s less room for boats at Bidwell Marina on Lake Oroville.
Find more then and now photos: California’s Shrinking Reservoirs

There’s less room for boats at Bidwell Marina on Lake Oroville.


Find more then and now photos: California’s Shrinking Reservoirs